Last week Deadspin highlighted an adventure Corey Dickerson had on the base paths. The post was titled “Corey Dickerson Boned Himself Out Of An Inside-The-Park Home Run,” and granted, that sounds more interesting than what actually happened: after he hit a triple, the ball squirted away from Brewers’ third baseman Aramis Ramirez and Dickerson tried to score from third. So it was a triple, an error, and a put-out. There was no opportunity for an inside-the-park-home run.

I can excuse Deadspin’s Tom Ley for the mistake — this kinda stuff is super complicated, particularly if you’ve never watched a full baseball game in your life. I also was not going to comment on Deadspin, or Gawker, or Kinja, or whatever the fuck they call it, because I really don’t have time to be harassed by all the really great sports fans who would probably defend such antics on the premise of baseball being boring or something. So I moved on with my life and didn’t say shit.

But not three days later, they made the same exact erroneous assertion. The post was titled, “Dioner Navarro Tries To Stretch Double Into Inside-The-Park-HR, Fails.” Again, this piqued my interest, mostly because it makes absolutely no sense — how does one go about stretching a double into a home run? Should I have tried this more when I played baseball? What is the success rate of trying to run two more bases than you should?

This time Samer Kalaf was the writer in question. What Kalaf presumably meant to say was Navarro tried to stretch a double and a throwing error into one more base than he should have, because that’s what happened. But again, that title doesn’t sound as good, and doesn’t attract as many clicks.

These Deadspin writers are like the grown-up version of that kid on your Little League team who ignored all stop signs and ran around the bases until he was either tagged out or scored and then told everybody he was leading the team in homers. I’m sure you hated that kid. I did too.

I’m done with Deadspin for awhile.

 

Note: I had the videos embedded for your viewing pleasure, but they were just 30 seconds of the MLB.tv screen with block lettering that said “This Video Is Not Yet Available.” You can watch them on the links provided, I do believe.